Behavioral Abstraction is Hiding Information

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This work has been published in a journal paper (J. of TCS) and in a workshop proceedings (CMCS'03). The journal version is an improved version of the one that appeared in the workshop proceedings.

J. of TCS

Behavioral Abstraction is Hiding Information
Grigore Rosu
J. of TCS, Volume 327(1-2), pp 197-221. 2004
Abstract. We show that for any behavioral \Sigma-specification ~{B} there is an ordinary algebraic specification \tilde{B} over a larger signature, such that a model behaviorally satisfies ~B iff it satisfies, in the ordinary sense, the \Sigma-theorems of \tilde{B}. The idea is to add machinery for contexts and experiments (sorts, operations and equations), use it, and then hide it. We develop a procedure, called unhiding, which takes a finite ~B and produces a finite \tilde{B}. The practical aspect of this procedure is that one can use any standard equational inductive theorem prover to derive behavioral theorems, even if neither equational reasoning nor induction is sound for behavioral satisfaction.
PDF, J.TCS, BIB


CMCS'05

Inductive Behavioral Proofs by Unhiding
Grigore Rosu
CMCS'03, Volume 82(1), pp 285-302. 2003
Abstract. We show that for any behavioral \Sigma-specification ~B there is an ordinary algebraic specification \tilde{B} over a larger signature, such that a model behaviorally satisfies ~B iff it satisfies, in the ordinary sense, the \Sigma-theorems of \tilde{B}. The idea is to add machinery for contexts and experiments (sorts, operations and equations), use it, and then hide it. We develop a procedure, called unhiding, which takes a finite ~B and produces a finite \tilde{B}. The practical aspect of this procedure is that one can use any standard equational inductive theorem prover to derive behavioral theorems, even if neither equational reasoning nor induction is sound for behavioral satisfaction.
PDF, Logic, DOI, CMCS'03, BIB

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